Today we answer listener questions about education, although most likely not at all in the way that anyone wanted. When it comes to deciding what kind of education to give your children (Public school? Private school? Homeschool?) we have only one direction for you: there is no such thing as neutrality, so do what you have to do to raise your children in the fear and admonition of the Lord. 

Too often, we want someone to tell us what kind of school is “okay” for our children. Before that question can even approach being answered, we must first know what education is. If we are to guide our children, we must know what path we are guiding them down. We can’t tell you what school to enroll your children in this fall, but we can know from Scripture what kind of path God requires of us.

Episode Navigation

1:00 Bears, beets, battlestar galactica.

6:30 Synesthesia v. anesthesia

12:00 Intro to listener questions on education.

14:15 What is none of our business.

17:20 They aren’t neutral, and you shouldn’t be.

 

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10 Comments

  1. Marghie Christensen

    Thank you ladies, for your podcast, for speaking truth, and for sharing your conversations with the world! Seriously, it’s so awesome to have like minded friends (even if you don’t know me yet:)

    Reply
  2. Dana Wilson

    We have five children. Three are adults. We love God. We live, by the power of the Holy Spirit, submitted to the Scriptures. We pray individually and as a family. We’ve homeschooled all of them from the beginning. Two of our three grown children are not Christians.

    Is education important? Yes! Is education from a biblical worldview essential for the children of Christian parents? Absolutely! Is it a guarantee that our children will walk every day in fellowship with Christ? Sadly, no. So we pray, we love, we trust, and we leave our children, their lives and futures, in the perfect, loving care of the One who alone does all things well.

    Reply
  3. Shannon R

    As a new mom to a toddler and one on the way who wants to homeschool but doesn’t feel adequate enough for it sometimes, I loved this episode! I’m curious about your thoughts on higher education. I know there are a lot of leftist professors who grade unfairly for having different beliefs from the students. I personally think I might push in the trade school direction unless of course my child has a calling that is needed for a 4 year degree or higher like a doctor.

    Reply
  4. Leigh

    I’m a product of the public school system. I also have a lot of student loan debt for a teaching degree I used three years (and then I had to unlearn all that I had been taught in my degree program as a homeschool mom). I was so horrified by what I saw ‘behind the scenes’ of public education, I knew I couldn’t have my children in public school – and I taught in a small, conservative town in a conservative state.

    This episode was brilliant and spot on!!! It’s nice to know I’m not even close to the only one who was led wrong as a child and is working to fix it as an adult.

    Reply
  5. Breigh Frederick

    I tried public school for my first born and decide to bring him home even though I felt completely unprepared. I jumped in and schooled my kids at home thru 8th and 4th grades. I then had to get a job to provide health insurance since my husband’s new job didn’t offer any. My job is the secretary of our elementary school. After 3 years I’m ready to quit. My husband has a new job with insurance. I have one kid in public high school and a junior high student homeschooling. After working in the public school system for a short time I see how teachers don’t believe that “regular” parents can homeschool their children. I have heard over and over as people pulled their students to homeschool due to the “pandemic”, “they will be back in a couple of weeks because they don’t know what they are doing and don’t realize how hard it is. I went to school for this!” I have tried to be a voice of reason with them but I am constantly reminded that if you do not have a teaching degree you are not qualified to teach. Thankful my teen was grounded and is grounded in Christ and is standing his ground. Thank you ladies for sharing! Several things have hit me over the last few days including listen to you and I’m at peace with leaving my job to be home more for my homeschooler. And to keep my thoughts on what it important.

    Reply
  6. Britney Ackley

    Thanks for your podcast, you articulated many of the reasons I chose to homeschool my kids. I have been homeschooling for13 years and my husband is a public school employee. He was a math teacher and has been a MS principal for 8 years. You had stated that, “If you don’t agree with the “religion” taught in public schools, you shouldn’t be teaching in those public schools.” He doesn’t not believe in the “religion” taught, but is tough enough to be able to withstand the pressure to work in an environment that is not nice to the conservative Christian worldview. His view is that Christians should be flocking into the public schools to combat the lies kids are taught. Teachers have a profound influence on how their state mandated curriculums are taught in their individual classrooms. There are often two sides of every lesson taught in schools and oftentimes one side is completely ignored. My husband has hired people of character(POCs), which often happen to be Christians. These Christians have the freedom to present all information to students and encourage discernment in areas where lies are being taught. He encourages his teachers to teach their students to become critical thinkers, something that is often lost in the public schools. His school counselor is a Christian and this is of immense importance when teens are asking life’s most pivotal questions about identity. He prays through the halls of his school building and connects with the local Moms In Prayer group. We agree with your reasons to homeschool wholeheartedly. But I respectfully disagree that Christians should not teach in the public school if they don’t agree with the “religion”. As discerning Christian adults with a teaching degree, you can be the last means of protection this young generation has against the lies of this culture. Thanks so much.

    Reply
    • Amy

      Yeah, I can see this. I was raised in a Christian home and when I got to high school, my high school English teacher loved calling on me to share my thoughts on the subject matter because she knew I would have a Christian perspective. She couldn’t share the gospel in class, but she couldn’t stop a student from doing so. So I do see some benefit of Christians being involved in public school.

      Reply
  7. Tangi

    I just wanted to give my two cents on this subject. I was raised in a public school and was introduced to the Lord through a teacher. I have been in public education for 15 years and work alongside many Christian teachers. We pray over our students, staff and school district regularly. We hold prayer before school for staff and parents who would like to join us. My daughter is in High School and has been able to bring two of her friends to her youth group which brought them to the lord. I think its a mistake to assume that all public school teachers and schools believe and teach in one way. I believe that being apart of public education has had a major impact on the people around me as I am open and share my faith with my students, parents and staff. Imagine if Christians flooded our school system and could speak to the joy and hope that we have.
    We do this by keeping our eyes on Jesus, the champion who initiates and perfects our faith. Hebrews 12:2

    Reply
    • Britney Ackley

      Amen, Tangi. My thoughts exactly to flood the schools. My kids entered the public schools in 7th grade and we continue to disciple them as they reach out and pray for other students.

      Reply
  8. Krystina

    Summer,
    You mentioned having your kids memorize Romans 1. Was there a particular reason you chose to start there? Is there something there you thought they needed to know first? I ask only because I’m trying to find a passage to start memorizing with my kids. Also, what did you do about different memorizing abilities? Some kids are faster and find it easier to memorize than others. Did you wait until everyone had a verse memorized or did you allow the faster ones to go ahead and learn more verses of the larger passage?
    Thank you both for the reminder of what I’m supposed to be focusing on with their education.

    Reply

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