If you have ever identified yourself as a feminist, this show is for you! Join Joy and Summer over the next few weeks as they discuss where feminism came from, what each wave has stood for, and why Christians shouldn’t own the title.

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38 Comments

  1. Paul Warren

    here in korea i need to take my shoes off in the pastor’s office – need to change into slippers to go to my desk.

    Reply
    • Nicole Ryberg

      I lived in Korea for a year and I loved how removing shoes was automatic and cultural. I was a teacher and we had “school slippers.”

      Reply
  2. Meghan

    I’m Canadian. Shoes off in the house. Always. Forever and ever, Amen.

    Reply
  3. Nikki schumacher

    Thank you 😊 I hate shoes worn in my house! Not only is it dirty for my babies but it RUINS carpet fast. I prefer shoes off and socks on after talking with numerous realtors, home builders and pro cleaning companies about their experience. Love the show!

    Reply
  4. Lawrence Marquez

    This is a fantastic and informative discussion. I had no idea the temperance movement and women’s suffrage movement had a direct connection.

    Reply
  5. CJ Alexander

    Hi ladies……thanks for the highly relevant subject matter. If people were truly interested in HISTORY, they would know these things……sadly, however………Also, shoes are a necessary evil, barefoot is next to holiness in my book…jk, but maybe not! Thanks for the movie reference to one of the funniest movies…ever. Keep fighting the good fight of faith.

    Reply
  6. Samantha Broccolo

    Great! Now I have that song stuck in my head!

    Great episode though!

    Reply
  7. Eric Bouchard

    “Ironically, the very foundation of Feminism is idolatry of men.” Never thought about it from that angle before, but you are absolutely right. Very well said.

    Reply
  8. Courtney

    I’ve never listened to Sheologians before but I think what you do is awesome. That episode was refreshing and fascinating. Feminism is such a huge topic with so many sub-points and misunderstandings. So y’all did a great job tackling such a big monster. As far as voting goes, however, what do you propose to do with single girls/young unmarried women? You may be of the persuasion that unmarried girls should live in their parents’ household forever. And then their vote still “counts”. (If so, I don’t think I could agree.) Thoughts? I’d love to hear your response!

    Reply
    • Liz

      I had the same question. 🙂

      Reply
      • Summer White

        We quickly mentioned that we favor the household vote. If a female is the head of her household, then….well…that’s that. 🙂

        Reply
        • Kim

          Here’s another question about voting. If women lived in a home with a domineering, abusive husband who shared completely differing views from her, would her voice actually be heard in a household vote?

          I agree that I wouldn’t mind a household vote in my current circumstances because my husband and I are in agreement and both seek the Lord together for our decisions about those matters. But I also know many women who are in less than ideal marriages where they aren’t to leave, biblically speaking. But their voices also would not be even considered, much less “heard.”

          I also realize that just because the law gives a woman a right, doesn’t mean her marriage would magically be better. And her husband may have still prevented her from actually exercising her right. And all this is just speculation. But I’m curious, how would you guys respond to such a situation? Would you still support the household vote?

          Thank you for these episodes. They have stretched me and I’ve enjoyed the challenge of thinking a bit more deeply about some areas of feminism that I hadn’t before considered.

          Reply
        • Ruth

          Hi
          Ladies, interested by the discussion, thanks for considering the issues. I live in the U.K. and work with muslims mainly from the Indian subcontinent. I understand your household vote in principle, – but I’ve not yet been into
          A Muslim home where the women’s opinion or need is valued, or taken into account. Should our U.K. Political system not work against the subjugation and abuse of these women by giving them a voice? How are we caring for these women when we leave them in the controll of unbelieving men? How does this view take into account that men -in their sin-don’t (unless they are believers) take into account the needs of the women in their households.

          Reply
  9. Ursula

    Looking forward to additional pdcasts. Thank you!

    Reply
  10. Suzannah

    Yay! So glad to see you tackling this, ladies.

    Question: Any comments on the terrorist tactics used by the first-wave suffragettes – eg bombing plots, throwing themselves under the racehorses at Ascot (also see: the trailer for the recent SUFFRAGETTE film, which surprisingly is somewhat grounded in fact)?

    Reply
  11. Amanda Lammott

    This was great! Loved the clarity given in the “history lesson.” HA ha people don’t believe me when I tell them that historically the femanisim platform was against abortion! Do you have a link to credible news source regarding this?

    Reply
  12. Colin Smith

    Hey, Summer! Mushroooom!! Long time no see! Even though I’m a Heologian, not a Sheologian, I enjoy your show, and recommend it to all five of my daughters. Question: Do you know how the household vote worked for single mothers back in the pre-women’s vote days? I’m especially thinking of women who were not single mums by choice (e.g., during the Civil War).

    Great topic. I look forward to the rest of the series.

    Blessings to you! Colin (aka SillyBrit)

    PS: Replace “buckle up” with “tighten your apron strings” 😉

    Reply
  13. Warren westfall

    I am truly offended that you didn’t thrash men! As a man I feel its the woman’s perogative to put me in my place! How can I ever be a man if my little helper didn’t inform me of how inadequate I am oh wait … lol good job ladies love the show😜😆

    Reply
  14. Kaylee

    Can you explain the prohibition of alcohol being sin?

    Reply
    • Joy B

      Yeah, I was wondering the same thing!

      Reply
      • Roberto

        I think the scripture from 1 Timothy 4:1-3 can be applied:

        “The Spirit clearly says that in later times some will abandon the faith and follow deceiving spirits and things taught by demons. Such teachings come through hypocritical liars, whose consciences have been seared as with a hot iron. They forbid people to marry and order them to abstain from certain foods, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and who know the truth.”

        As we can see, forbidding (prohibiting) marriage and certain foods is considered demonic teaching (i.e. Sin). I think this can be extended to prohibiting alcohol since alcohol, like food, can be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and who know the truth.

        Reply
  15. P

    Learned about you today from an FB link (Reformed Pub) and am excited to see what you’ve got ladies! As a reformed Christian woman raised in an uber-liberal era (having been saved by God’s grace in my mid-forties and am now in my early 50s), there is no other area in my life that creates as much tension as this one. My worldly views are so deeply entrenched that I still reflexively cringe when listening to the Biblical worldview of feminism. Not in regards to abortions, or to the demise of the family, or to the emasculation of men, all of which I grieve, but to women themselves, and what they’re capable of. My Mom was a single parent who raised 3 kids on her own. She was married, but my father turned out to be an absent alcoholic. She benefited from programs designed to empower women like her who wanted more for her kids than the projects we were living in. I don’t mean welfare or financial assistance, but training and education, all under the umbrella of feminism (perhaps that “second wave” you alluded to?). My Mom got us out of those projects and effected every single family member after that, who dared to dream a better life for themselves and their children. We all got out, praise the Lord. I’ve always given credit for her accomplishment to the feminist culture that gave her those opportunities. My hope, ladies, is that you truly are going to have respectful discourse about feminism and how it is unbiblical, and not just beat up liberals, which is far too easy to do. It’s been my experience that women don’t talk about this tension enough – instead there’s the Proverbs 31 woman versus the tree-hugging hippie divorcé. Looking forward to future podcasts, but I’m especially looking forward to the Holy Spirit continuing to grabbing ahold of me in this area of my life, letting go of who I thought I was, and surrendering to become the woman that God says that I am.

    Reply
    • Laura

      Thank you for saying this! I identify with your comments. Acting as though these things are just instructions to give to those who are ” wondering” is not an effective conversational tone. These young ladies sound pretentious and unattractive to interact with

      Reply
      • Summer White

        We were nowhere near finished with the conversation after the first episode in a four episode long conversation. We will touch more on what you mentioned wanting to hear in our wrap-up episode next week.

        Thanks for taking the time to listen to us “unattractive” ladies, Laura!

        Reply
  16. Joelle MacDowell

    Excellent Ladies!

    Reply
  17. Liz McKeon

    Loving this “series” (I know, I know). While I think it’s important to understand how the history effects the present, and you’ve commented on how the historical context isn’t really applicable (such as voting being a family vote, not a man privilege, but how hard that would be to go back to that thought), could you spend a whole podcast how to qualify ourselves as equal but different in our current context? BTW PLEASE come up with a new term for us conservative women trying to lead Christ-centered lives!!! Maybe some kind of play on “imago dei”:). PS-Please link some books/articles/sites for the history things!

    Reply
    • Summer White

      We will be discussing how women should be viewed in our wrap up of the discussion next week 🙂

      Reply
  18. Beth

    “Everything they were fighting for was a departure from God’s design”
    How do you conclude that women back then were treated as if they possessed the same value as a man? If the household vote wasn’t discriminatory against women than widows and abandoned wives/mothers should have been able to vote. But they could not, because they were not allowed to own property. Women were discriminated against and were not treated as valuable – THAT is not God’s design.
    Your husband or father (or Uncle or cousin) voting for you is NOT the same as having your own vote, regardless of your gender. Claiming that women did have the right vote before the suffrage movement is misleading, at best.

    Reply
    • Summer White

      You must have misheard us. 🙂
      We never claimed women have always been treated fairly or equally.
      The household vote was discriminatory by nature. It said “here is who can vote.” We never said it wasn’t. We said we like the idea of a household vote in so much as we support the household being foundational to society. We acknowledged we could not go back to the household vote the way it was done. AND if we did, we would view a single woman or a widowed woman as the “head” of her household. Distinctions….so important!

      Reply
    • Aly

      👍

      Reply
    • Aly

      👍 @beth

      Reply
  19. Nicole Ryberg

    Excited for this series!

    Reply
  20. Gina

    I listen to Sheologians all the time. LOVE you guys! Informative, thought-provoking, funny, stirring, intelligent, girly, strong, etc. 🙂

    Please keep the podcasts coming!

    Reply
  21. Debbie Renfro

    Please send me your weekly(?) discussion link. Very intriguing.

    Reply
  22. Aly

    Thanks for the podcast. This is my first time listening, and you seem like sweet ladies. I don’t usually comment on things (because comments can get ugly!) and I’m honestly a little scared to post anything here that would be contrary to what was said in the podcast, because I know when I have the feminism discussion with my more conservative Christian friends, they can get pretty tense. I am a Christian, and I would consider myself third-wave-feminist-ish. I agree with many points. I think it would be good for society if non-abortive birth control methods were made more readily and cheaply available. I think we need to end gender violence. I think we need to not blame rape on women. I think we need to respect women who raise their children full-time and women who have careers. And most importantly, we need to fight for women who are being treated poorly in other countries who don’t have it as easy as we do in the west.

    I agree with much of third-wave feminism, so I don’t see a problem using that term for myself, with a few caveats added. I don’t think you need to 100% agree with a label in order to use it. For example, political parties. Hardly anyone I know agrees completely with the political party they identify with. It’s a quick way to paint a general picture of your opinions that you can elaborate further on. I would use a word other than feminism to say that I care about the rights and political equality of women, but unfortunately a label that anyone would recognize for that doesn’t exist.

    I think the issue with using the label “feminist” comes up most with my friends who don’t know about the nuances of feminism and assume when people say they are “feminists” that they are of the second-wave variety–raging, angry, and just want abortions and indiscriminate sex. It’s just not great to make assumptions like that. I absolutely don’t think you ladies are doing this, but I know a lot of my more conservative Christian friends do, and it really builds a wall up and closes the conversation.

    Though I don’t agree with many of your conclusions, I really appreciate that you did research into feminism and are explaining the waves. I think this will help your listeners be more informed when they meet people who identify as feminists. I definitely don’t see this changing the minds of anyone who strongly identifies as feminists (especially since you say you love fighting feminism….that seems like it could come off a bit antagonistic to anyone who disagrees, but your general demeanor seems friendly and positive).

    Anyway, your podcast has certainly made me re-think what exactly I believe and why, so thank you.

    Reply
  23. Emily

    Could you explain what you mean exactly by the prohibition of alcohol being sin?

    Reply
  24. Laura

    I can’t believe I’m hearing someone actually saying what I believe about even first wave feminism. I told someone recently that if getting rid of feminism meant that I had to give up my vote, I’d do it in a heartbeat. They looked at me like I had three heads. I really hate what the feminist rebellion has done to our country, our families, and our churches. Keep podcasting, ladies!

    Reply
  25. Jeff

    Do you have a bibliography on this topic? I could not find one on your web page. Much appreciated!

    Reply

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  1. God Kills Babies: A Feminist-y Type of Argument - Sheologians - […] Discussing feminism is perhaps one of my most favorite pastimes and since the release of our first episode on…

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